3.12.2012

Foxgloves...

foxgloves
What an incredibly happy birthday weekend! Wow! I'm excited to see where 35 takes me. Today, it's taking me outside to dig in the dirt and enjoy the incredible weather. PRH and the kiddos gave me some flower bulbs, foxgloves, and some beautiful new pruning sheers for my birthday (that PRH conveniently...ahem...used to prune the apple trees this weekend. I love that man.). I've never planted foxgloves and was surprised to see the seed packaging indicate that they grew up to 5 feet. Yikes! After sniffing around on the interwebs, I also read that they can be poisonous to pets and children (if eaten). You can't always believe what you read online, so I'm curious- has anyone ever experienced an allergic reaction to foxgloves? I'm planting them close to the road in a part of the yard where the kids don't play, so I'm not worried about them getting into them. I also won't be adding them to salads or stews.

The image above is from a site called Gardening with Mo Gilmer

19 comments:

Anonymous said...

foxglove is also known as digitalis, from which the heart medication digitoxin (or maybe digoxin) is derived...in the right dosage & form it can save lives, but like many meds can otherwise be totally poisonous...

bklopst said...

I have them in my garden too. They tend to run wild !!
Lovely flowers though, foxgloves. Also great ' vase' flowers!
Never heard they were poisonous; i know they have been used in medicine and that an overdose of digitalis can lead to health problems.
I think you should be ok.

Hanna said...

It's not an allergic reaction, it's a true toxicity: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digoxin_toxicity

deblbern said...

I love Foxgloves. They will indeed reach 5 feet and they are poisonous. The first year, you'll just have leaves, but the next year the plant will send out its flowering stems. Their blooms will go on and on, so enjoy!

Anonymous said...

I'm living in the Seattle now, but from Owego originally, and fox gloves seem to be a wildflower around here. I've handled it without protection before, with no ill effects. Perhaps some people have an allergy. It must not be eaten, but that goes for lots of plants (like the nightshade that grows wild in Owego).

chiara said...

My mom has always had foxgloves and we've never had a problem....they are so gorgeous. Can't wait to see what you grow.

brianne said...

Totally plant foxgloves! They grow abundantly wild here (we ended up with a few in our backyard last year), and although I know they are technically poisonous I've never heard a case of it being an issue. I've handled them a lot and never had an exterior allergic reaction, so I wouldn't be too worried. They are biennials, though, so if you plant seeds this year, I'm not sure if they'll flower this season? They might, though!

Julia said...

It's not an allergic reaction. Foxglove is Digitalis, which can affect the heart, if ingested in large quantities. You would have to eat a pile of it however, and we've never had any issues with anyone, animal or human, eating ours. They are lovely biennial flowers, well worth growing, and they grow easily from seed.

The Langley Family said...

We had foxgloves growing all around our house when I was a kid. My mom told my sister and I they were poisonous, but I don't remember if we ever picked them or not. I loved them, because it was so fascinating to watch the bees crawl all the way into each bloom. Still one of my favorite flowers that reminds me of my childhood.

Adu said...

Foxgloves are full of digitalis, the product that is used in cardiac medicine, and is very toxic when eaten. It is called 'vingerhoedskruid' in dutch ;)

Sarah @ { rad: renovations are dirty } said...

I had planted some a few years ago, and the blooms were gorgeous: they were my favourite flowers. But, when I got a dog, I (carefully) ripped them out because I read too many horror stories online involving pets and people. From what I recall, all parts of the plant are toxic, so I didn't want to take a chance with my inquisitive dog.

Petra said...

What a lovele name 'foxgloves'. In Dutch we call them thimble weed. I have also heard that they are toxic, but I have never heard of anyone getting sick of these plants. I had them in our garden when the children were little.

bklopst said...

I ALWAYS HAVE HAD DOGS AND DIGITALIS IN MY GARDEN..NEVER EXPERIENCED ANY PROBLEMS..MY DOGS NEVER EAT OR HAVE EATEN MY GARDENPLANTS THOUGH ..OR AT LEAST I NEVER SAW THEY DID..

zameander said...

yeah, when we were planning our smallish, so-cal garden (with kids in the near future), we went so far as to tear out the Oleander and planted EDIBLE plants -- lots of mints and sages and other herbs, as well as nasturtiums and violets and roses.
look for the local equivalent of this:
http://ucanr.org/sites/gardenweb/files/72929.pdf

Jamie said...

Ditto everyone on the digitalis, so don't eat them. They are truly beautiful though; I have them wild on my property and I swear they're taller than 5 feet. Plus, they look really cool in the fall when they die off and the blooms go to seed. The dog has never shown any interest in them and she'll get into just about anything. = )

leFiligree said...

well, many garden plants are poisonous. even rhubarb has poisonous leaves. what about having a whole bed of dangerous plants like baneberry, monkshood, larkspur, lupine, columbine, lily of the valley, bleeding heart, and elderberries.

A Beautiful Party said...

Very very happy belated Birthday to you. Hope it wa super fantastic!

Kitty said...

This comes a bit late, but since no one has said the thing that seems pertinent if you have small children, I'll weigh in! The real risk is that children will do what foxgloves seem made for - popping individual flowers on the tops of their fingers (digitalis is the hint here: digits). Then, if they are anything like every other child in the world, they lick their fingers. They probably won't die of it, but you see how foxgloves are easier to ingest than other poisonous plants? My sister and I had the fear of God put in us about this when we were small, so you could just plant them and try the same terror techniques as my mother... Delphiniums might give the same effect, or lupins, perhaps?

Anonymous said...

Two weeks ago I bought and planted foxglove. I have been to my physician due to an allergic reaction all over my face, arms, hands, and hairline. I did not wear gloves when handing the foxglove and am having a great amount of difficulty getting over this reaction. I was prescribed prednisone steroid for 10 days. I have been off of the steroid for 3 days now and am broken out agiain. I may be one of the few that has a reaction to the foxglove, but would hate to see a child' endure this discomfort. Please so not plant where children or elderly can come in contact. The pollen is extremely toxic as well as the other parts of the plant. Had there been a warning before I bought I never would have bought and planted. Lesson learned.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...