1.17.2012

Exposed ceilings...

renovationPRH is working on the mudroom today. He goes back to school on Friday (he teaches art/design at a university) and wants to get the mudroom cleaned up beforehand. This is what the room looked like a few months ago. It has drywall now, but we've left the ceiling exposed like this (I did vacuum the insulation off and PRH fixed the lights). Lately I've been obsessed with exposed, loft-style ceilings- not just exposed beams, I'm talking exposed ceilings like this image from stadshem (found via altruism in the morning)...

exposed ceilings
or this image of photographer Carter Smith's home from the January 2007 issue of House & Garden (photo by Martyn Thompson found via moodboard)...

exposed ceilings
or this image from one of my favorite books, Restoring a House in the City by Ingrid Abramovitch (project by G.P. Schafer Architect). Both the wildly expensive range and built-in shelf in the corner make me drool...

renovation
Our mudroom is certainly not a gorgeous space, but it will have exposed ceilings...for now. All of the ceilings in our house need to be re-done and I'm seriously considering this look. With the right floors, it could be pretty fabulous. What do you think? Yay or nay?

17 comments:

Martha said...

A big, big yay to exposed ceilings! The only issue is insulation and heat, I guess. My husband and I have been designing our dream timber frame home and it definitely features a lot of exposed ceilings, and reclaimed wood.

Skylark Studio said...

I love this idea! We have an 1800 Victorian house with lovely big beams underneath our skanky drop ceilings - but what to do about all the exposed bathroom pipes? not pretty copper pipes but big fat white plastic honkers that were put in when they added a bathroom. UGH! we've come to discover that drop ceilings were usually put in for a reason. gross.

as my husband says "can we really not open another can of worms right now?" ha!

kudos on your project, you are doing a fabulous job!

OctoNoctua said...

I became obsessed with exposed ceilings when I went to the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design. Both the dorms and school were built in old warehouses in the Third Ward, which used to be a district of factories.

In the dorms, there were three floors, the 3rd, 4th and 5th (no 1st and 2nd!), and had 15, 15 and 20 foot exposed ceilings, respectively. We had hammocks and whole second floors built in those rooms, it was awesome.

I say do the ceilings. It adds a rugged authenticity that few other features can in a house - just by the beams being overhead, they have a weight to them that is really memorable.

Luckily, with such a prominent feature in the house, you can keep things more simple (and cheaper) elsewhere.

I'm so excited to see how it all turns out!

Missy said...

Really great look. The only drawback I am imagining is that it may make the room seem dark? Especially if there are no/few windows? Though if all else is white or a light color in the room, it would make for a nice contrast.

gail said...

We were going to go this route in our house, but one of my hobbies is feng shui, and exposed beams are a huge no-no within this discipline....lots of arrow-like, jagged, intercepting energy. Our compromise, which has been wonderful, was to put up white-washed spruce board ceilings, Scandinavian style. There's still the look of wood, but no cobwebs, no added vacuuming chores. And great feng shui.

robyn said...

pretty: yes, cold: definitely. Brrrrr.
We have about a foot of insulation above our ceilings and the inspector said we could use more. As cold as I have been this first winter in our home, I am in agreement.

Carrie said...

We're in the midst of renovating a house as a rental and we're looking into every idea that could save us money (as the house sometimes feels like Tom Hank's Money Pit!). Anyway, one of the things we've been considering is leaving the ceiling exposed in the living/dining/kitchen area and only replacing the sheetrock on the bedroom ceilings. I love the photos that you shared and I'm glad to see we might not be totally crazy. ;-)

Joy Fisher said...

Love the exposed ceiling idea, but how do you keep the heat from escaping? Is there some other way to insulate that lets you keep them open? I've always wanted to do this myself, but my father in law always poo-poos it because of the insulation issue. I'll be curious to know how you handle it.

Jen said...

Yes! Exposed ceilings for sure! At. least in rooms without pipes, etc as Skylark Studio said. I am sure however you do it, it will look awesome.

mooi hoor... said...

Agree with the optics. But like a couple of commenters already said: Energy bill will go through the roof :(

leFiligree said...

love those pics of exposed ceilings. we have them only because we ripped stuff out and havent put back, but it /could/ be a great intentional look, as long as the rest of the room is put together.

the only downside is if you ever want to sheetrock, ceilings are done before walls so the ceiling rock can be supported by the wall rock. but who cares about the future, right?

Heather said...

I huge YAY!

Karyn said...

Yay! Timeless. Beautiful. Interesting. You.

Chelsea said...

YaY!

Katie said...

I've been a lurker for a while now -- Hello! I would actually have to say nay, though. I see cobwebs, darkness, dust, basement, heat loss...

I really love what you are doing elsewhere, though! Keep on keepin' on...

Anonymous said...

As someone who has been incrementally insulating an old house, I must say I loooove being warm. And in the mud room pic, it just made me feel cold. I like the spruce board ceiling idea....

karey bunch said...

I guess we're lucky to live in Florida, where we don't usually consider heating costs, but I'm definitely FOR the exposed beams. They bring a gorgeous, natural element into the room, and that would be worth the extra task of cleaning cobwebs, for me at least.

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