4.02.2010

Minimalist...


I want to try to make some concrete planters this year. I'd like them to look like larger-scale versions of these planters from tortoise loves donkey. They're perfect. Has anyone tried making concrete planters before? Any advice?

9 comments:

paintergirl said...

i would love to make concrete planters - perhaps more 50's style. that would be a great project!

Sarah said...

The latest Martha Stewart has a whole section on making your own planters out of cement. I'm not sure this is the complete article but it's at least a start...
http://www.marthastewart.com/article/pots-with-a-personal-touch. Good luck!

Jane Flanagan said...

I haven't tried, but there were instructions in March edition of Martha Stewart Living - they looked really good (no surprise there!)

Dragonfly said...

I can't remember where I saw this idea, but it looked so neat. You know those wooden boxes that you get clementines in? Or something like that...they filled them with potting soil then planted flowers in them. The slats make it easy for the water to drain out, and the boxes look neat scattered around your porch filled with beautiful flowers or herbs.

Cheryl Arkison said...

Just don't make them too big. It is so tempting to make them as big as we actually want, but they are so, so heavy! And put in drainage holes or you are going to add weight with gravel for drainage.

Victoria Bennett Beyer said...

I don't have any tips, but these are so cool. Thanks for sharing.

Wolfie and the Sneak said...

look up hypertufa--it uses peat to make a lighter concrete mixture (not that using peat is good)
I think that's what Martha used to make hers.
Also--when using molds, be sure to liberally grease them up to release the concrete.

Anonymous said...

Perhaps incorporate a plastic liner in the design? Some plants get chlorosis from alkalines leaching into the soil from the concrete.

Heather Leigh said...

You can experiment with different form liners for different finishes. For a really smooth finish, try lining your forms with shiny metallic poster board.

Also, strength and work-ability are inversely related- and both depend on the amount of water you use. Less water= more strength, but lower work-ability. Try to find the right balance. Larger, thin areas may need some reinforcing (wire lath) incorporated.

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